"Sit and Get" Won't Grow Dendrites

Make professional development unforgettable Teaching busy adults can be a daunting task. How do you grab their attention and make material memorable? Expert Marcia Tate knows how adults learn best and shares 20 professional development strategies that work. What you’ll find in the 2nd edition: 20 learning strategies proven to engage adults and boost long-term retention 150 professional learning activities that spark educator participation New findings on learning styles, brain research, and adult learning theory References to the new Learning Forward Professional Standards Samples of professional learning designs Guided reflection and application sections

Shouting Won't Grow Dendrites

Dispel discipline problems with new classroom management techniques! Behavioral problems often occur when students are bored or unmotivated. This newly revised edition from education expert, Marcia L. Tate, helps you detour students around misbehavior. Tate provides updated research, new vignettes, the latest classroom management, and Common Core-aligned techniques that will help: • Establish a relationship with students that supports deep learning • Deliver brain-compatible lessons • Work with students who have attention deficit disorder and chronic behavior problems • Promote student concentration and memory with classroom arrangement, light, color, and music Implement the crucial elements for lasting motivation and engagement with this essential guide!

Energize the High School Classroom

There is so much more to teaching today than simply teaching. Prepping for multiple courses, grading papers, duties, coaching, class advising, lack of parental support, limited administrative support, etc. These distractions make it more and more difficult to find the time to sustain a level of creativity in the classroom. Everyone could use a playbook. Something to refer to that provides that specific spark or research that can enhance the classroom experience. This book will provide you with ways to deliver curriculum, not organize it. The best material in the world is often ignored by students because of the method it is delivered. You may even discover that after reading and implementing ideas from this book, you will begin to surprise yourself with additional ideas of your own.

Techniques in Classroom Management

This book will help teacher educators, preservice and classroom teachers, and administrators investigate and discuss common issues in classroom management at the secondary level. It will also serve as a supplement to many approaches to teaching classroom management by offering case studies that reflect common issues teachers will face in their classrooms. The case studies that are included address classroom procedures, equity in the classroom, disruptions by students, rules and consequences, rewards, classroom climate, teacher-student relationships, and other problems relating to classroom management.

Doing Practitioner Research Differently

Doing Practitioner Research Differently encourages those embarking on practitioner research to consider the validity of innovative methods and styles of reporting. The book looks at three methods of enquiry and reporting - visualisation, conversation and fictional writing. Using practitioners' own accounts and research reports as case studies, this book explores the reasons why some practitioners reject the traditional research methods. It looks at the challenges faced by these practitioners and the conditions in higher education that encourage or inhibit innovative practitioner research. The case studies used illustrate that there are modes of enquiry and reporting that can foster the development of professional thinking and practice.

Growing Musicians

Growing Musicians: Teaching Music in Middle School and Beyond focuses on teaching adolescents within the context of a music classroom, regardless of content area (orchestra, band, choir, or general music). It provides a look at the importance of music courses in the lives of adolescents as they navigate the path between being a child and an adult. As every music student is completely unique, there is no one-size-fits-all prescriptive way of working with this age group. Rather, music educators must approach adolescents with high musical standards and aspirations to learn and achieve within music; a willingness to honor the individuality of each adolescent musician; a sense of structure, but an ability to be flexible; a desire to foster and promote a safe classroom environment where students feel empowered to be themselves and speak openly about what they think and believe; an understanding that music classes are not only safe places where students learn how to become better musicians but also better people through musical experiences focused on humanity and empathy; and a dose of humor, or at least the ability to acknowledge that adolescents are extremely funny whether or not they realize it. In addition, this book encourages pre-service and practicing music educators to mindfully examine and better understand their own teaching practices.